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You've Got to Be Fucking Kidding Me

The Long-term Consequences of WLS - Rich & Heather's Story

My name is Rich, but I may be better known to some of you as richie79 of the UK who used to post prolifically here on Big Fat Blog and elsewhere in the Fatosphere for many years. Don't know if any of the old faces are still around but I wanted to share my wife Heather's story and felt this was maybe as good as any a place do it. If you believe otherwise, please let me know and I'll remove it.

In February 2005 a pretty girl with big brown eyes by the screen name of 'sweetheather86' sent me a 'smile' through a plus-size dating website of which we were both members. At the time I was at a low point following the failure of a previous long-term relationship. Heather and I hit it off almost immediately despite her being in the US and at 18, almost 7 years younger than I. Looking forward to daily emails from one another quickly progressed to a first nervous long-distance phonecall, nightly 4-hour chat sessions on MSN and before either of us knew it I'd booked a ticket to Boston. Two incredible weeks on from our first shy meeting at Logan Airport I knew this was the one person I wanted to spend the rest of my life with.

The only cloud on the horizon was the gastric bypass Heather underwent just two weeks after we first made contact. Even then I knew of the horrendous risks of these operations but although I had already fallen for her, didn't feel i knew her well enough to ask her to delay or reconsider it. She came from a long line of big women and had herself been fat throughout childhood, resulting in numerous failed diets and all the bullying and self-loathing that accompanies being a fat child / teen. At the time the media was full of stories of this 'magic bullet' and several of her family members had undergone the surgery with dramatic initial results. She told me that she wanted it done so that she could have all the things in life she had been convinced were not available to people of her size - someone to love her, a home and a family, access to nice clothes, and not to be abused and harassed in public. Tragically she later told me that she opted for the bypass as unlike the lap-band it was irreversible (the stomach is cut in two and 18" of small intestine removed and discarded) and therefore offered no opportunity to back out at a later stage.

Our relationship continued to blossom even as her health began to deteriorate. Each of us crossed the Atlantic to spend long periods together in one another's countries and during this time we crammed in as many activities, visits etc as many couples do in a lifetime. In September 2007 I proposed to her and she accepted tearfully and without hesitation; we were married two years later almost to the day and having obtained a spousal visa, in July 2010 she finally moved to Leeds in the UK to live with me full-time. By this point she had lost around 200lb and gained back almost 100lb of that. She was on a cocktail of drugs, could eat very little, suffered from constant dumping syndrome and was developing problems with joint pain, blood sugar and constant fatigue, all of which were exacerbated by a revision to the original surgery to repair the staples but which further reduced the range of foods she was able to eat.

In October 2010 Heather gave me the news that she was pregnant. Our joy at this was tempered only by concerns about her deteriorating health. Fortunately apart from having to be artificially rehydrated several times (she suffered from such debilitating nausea throughout the pregnancy that she was at times unable to keep down fluids) her pregnancy passed largely without serious incident. Our son Ben was born in June the following year; despite several attempts to induce her at term plus two weeks she never progressed to active labour and had to undergo an emergency Caesarean section on one of the hottest days of the year in an overwhelmed Leeds General Infirmary where she was treated like an inconvenience by several of the medical staff.

Her surgeon in the US had recommended a UK counterpart in our city who might have been able to help but NHS rules decreed she would first have to see a dietician. As was often the case I went along with her as she was rightly worried that this would be used as yet another opportunity to shame her about her weight; predictably the dietician told her that on her sub-1000 caloric intake it was 'impossible' for her to be maintaining at 320lb and that there must be something she wasn't telling her (because *everyone knows* that fat people always lie about their eating habits). This was followed up by a barium swallow which suggested she may be suffering from a stricture (narrowing) of the digestive tract and the prospect of further investigation, though subsequent events meant this never ultimately took place.

On the weekend of 8th February 2013 I went to visit friends in another city an hour away from home. Heather had encouraged this rare weekend away, as we took it in turns to give one another breaks from the stresses of young parenthood when possible. She waved me off at the train station with hugs and kisses and called to tell me goodnight later that evening. That would be the last time I ever heard from her. My attempts to contact via text and phone throughout Saturday went unanswered and, knowing how out of character this was, my friend drove me home. Unable to gain access to the house, which she'd locked from within the previous night, I frantically called the police, who broke in through our basement and found her collapsed in our bathroom. I was told that she'd been gone for some hours. Our little one was fortunately still upstairs in his crib and none the worse but for need of a clean diaper, a good feed and a cuddle.

Initially we thought the cause may have been related to a persistent headache she'd been complaining of but which her doctor had failed to take seriously. The results of the post-mortem however showed the truth to be far worse. Unbeknown to anyone she'd developed a fistula at the site of the gastric bypass surgery. This had suddenly ruptured causing, as the report put it 'destruction of chest cavity and diaphragm through discharge of gastric material'. I don't even want to imagine the discomfort my poor sweet girl likely suffered in her last hours, or to think that the surgery on which she'd once pinned her hopes of acceptance (and subsequently come to regret when she realised that her happiness was not weight-dependent) had been a ticking timebomb from the very outset of our relationship.

Heather was without a doubt one of the sweetest, kindest, most loving people I have ever had the privilege to know. In a world beset with so much cruelty and unpleasantness she was a revelation of tolerance and humanity. For the first time in my 33 years she made me comfortable in my own skin, gave me confidence to be myself and become a stronger person through my recent diagnosis with Asperger's Syndrome, a strength that only left me two Saturdays ago. Our long-distance relationship was forged in patience and anticipation of better days ahead, giving us a depth of connection that is all too rare and making us soul mates in every sense of the word. Heather loved me for my differences and quirks rather than despite them, as I loved hers and trusted her implicitly. In turn she told me that my unconditional love for her had finally given her the contentment and safety she craved when so much of her life had been marked by pain and unhappiness. She often said 'I'll always be your girl', over the years it became our little refrain that she would add to the bottom of cards and emails and tell me last thing at night. My life, Ben's life, those of all who knew her and the world at large will be all the poorer for her absence from them. Rest in peace forever sweetheart, know no more pain or torment, and I'll be counting the days till I'm back at your side.

(Cross-posted as 'Rich & Heather - Love Can Bridge an Ocean' to 'First Do No Harm' blog at www.fathealth.wordpress.com, WLS Uncensored Yahoo group and my personal FB page).

WLS Surgeon Faked Data in Medical Studies

From Retraction Watch: Three more retractions for weight loss surgeon Edward Shang for making up data.

Edward Shang, the weight loss surgeon who lost his job at the University of Leipzig in May after it was revealed that he had made up most, if not all, of the patients in his research studies at the University of Mannheim, has retracted three more papers...

The authors of the above articles have requested their withdrawal, notifying the Journal that the clinical trials described in the articles were not conducted as written in the article. The Editor-in-Chief, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, and the Publisher have determined to retract the articles.

The first paper has been cited three times, according to Thomson Scientific’s Web of Knowledge, while the third one has been cited 32 times.

Shang has already retracted a study in Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, and one in Obesity Surgery. A May 9 University of Leipzig press release refers to a total of six retractions, so there is apparently one more on the way.

Here are the three latest studies in question:

  • Pump-assisted versus gravity-controlled enteral nutrition in long-term percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy patients: a prospective controlled trial. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 2003;27:216-219.
  • Pump-assisted enteral nutrition can prevent aspiration in bedridden percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy patients. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 2004;28:180-183.
  • The Influence of early supplementation of parenteral nutrition on quality of life and body composition in patients with advanced cancer. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 2006;30:222-230.

Feeding tubes? Really?

Google "feeding tube diet" or Ketogenic Enteral Nutrition (KEN) Diet. There are a whole bunch of neutral to positive, freak show style news items. Take your pick.

Done?

You may have noticed that this weight loss diet is so incredibly embarrassing and moronic that a Google search will turn up several negative articles on the first page of results.

  • Canadian obesity specialist Yoni Freedhoff, who is a bit of a nutritional puritan but who helped nix the Epcot Center's crap Habit Heroes exhibition, thinks it's medical malpractice. He skewers it in a post called "Church booked? Check. Flowers? Check. Feeding Tube? Check?" Well, yeah. Sounds like medical malpractice to me too. Thanks for pointing that out.

  • Google News has an item called "Feeding Tube Diet? Irresponsible Doctors Condone Anorexia". The fun thing about this article is that the author clearly finds the whole thing problematic - but only when it's used by people who aren't 'morbidly obese.' For very fat people, she thinks it sounds like an excellent weight loss option.

Much as I think that Freedhoff is an okay guy for a diet doctor, I've got to say that the Yahoo article is less hypocritical than his. Don't get me wrong. I agree with everything he says about the feeding tube diet. But, this is someone who is not terribly critical of weight loss surgery. A feeding tube is less invasive than weight loss surgery and it can be removed at any time. It seems likely that the only advantage that weight loss surgery has over a permanently installed feeding tube is that it's invisible. The fact that you're tampering with your body in order to physically enforce a starvation diet isn't apparent to every single person who looks at you. But really, it's not that different. In fact, the feeding tube is not nearly as extreme and risky. It is easily reversible and does not involve the ol' slice and dice.

The feeding tube diet is marketed as a quick and easy way to lose weight. Apparently it provides 800 calories a day with no carbs, and they claim that people don't get hungry. It would be nice for the dieters if that were true, because it physically prevents them from eating. Side effects may include bad breath, constipation, dizziness, acid reflux, and nausea.

In a society that thinks weight loss surgery is a good idea, why would anyone be surprised that people want a doctor to stick a feeding tube up their noses and down their throats to provide a minimum amount of nutrition and prevent them from eating? It makes perfect sense. Not-so-fat people who love the idea of weight loss surgery but aren't eligible for it must be delighted by this new option.


I'm not surprised by it, but it is still hard for me to understand (emotionally) why someone would do this to themselves. The old "easy way out" trope doesn't fit any better than it does with weight loss surgery. This is public. It is humiliating. It is physically unpleasant and disempowering. It seems to come from a place of deep frustration and an antagonistic mind-body relationship. I keep slipping into thoughts of masochism, penance, and the mortification of the flesh. It's a self destructive (or at least risk embracing) form of self punishment. The same human impulses have found a home in religion in the past. What are those impulses acting in service of here, and why are they such a persistent part of human nature? I obviously haven't thought this all the way through, but I'm putting it out there.

A few other thoughts...

As far as I can tell, there is currently only one American doctor who is willing to insert feeding tubes for weight loss. However, this is all over the North American news. It occurs to me that:

1. All of this news coverage is free publicity for this dumb idea and it will probably spread the word to every greedy and ethically impaired doctor in North America. Coming soon: a feeding tube diet doctor in your area!

2. The news coverage sure does support the "young women are stupid, lazy and vain" trope.

British police and press confuse BMI with fitness

It sounds like straightforward weight discrimination, right? British cops being fired or docked pay because of their BMIs?

No. That's not it at all. They're instituting an annual fitness test, and police officers that fail it three times in a row could have their pay lowered.

The problem here is that the press in the UK (and the US) think that being classified as "overweight" or "obese" is exactly the same thing as being physically unfit. The link between "being out of shape" and "overweight and obesity" is so strong in their minds that they are using the two concepts interchangeably in headlines.

The root cause: Reuter's inaccurately titled article, Obese UK police officers face pay cuts. Reuter's is one of the world's biggest news services, and many newspapers copy their articles without any further research, if not word-for-word. If you look up this story now, some of the headlines are a bit more rational. However, when this story first turned up on my newsfeed yesterday, the headlines were consistently as idiotic as the ones above. This is probably because the earlier articles were more heavily dependant on Reuters.

Based on these headlines, it seems that most members of the press don't understand what "overweight" and "obese" mean. "Overweight" is defined as a BMI between 25 and 30 and "obese" is defined as a BMI over 30. A 5'-8" tall person who weighs 165 (11 stone) is overweight. A 5'-8" tall person who weighs 200 pounds (14 stone) is obese.

There are plenty of people who fall into those categories who are very fit; not only strong, but capable of running fast over long distances. And guess what? People whose BMIs fall into the "normal" range and especially the "underweight" range can be very unfit. So, this isn't about being overweight or obese at all. It will (presumably) hit unfit, thin police officers just as hard as unfit, fat officers.

Now, I don't know the details of this fitness test. I hope that it takes more than just distance running into consideration, because let's be honest. Heavier people do tend to be stronger while lighter people tend to be faster, and both of those characteristics can be useful to a police officer. Fight and flight, right?

I also hope that they're taking age, experience, and the type of work these officers do into consideration. Some older officers may be less physically fit but have better judgement; better mental and emotional fitness for the job. Some officers may have old injuries that limit their performance on the fitness test, or they may have a physical disability. They may be working desk jobs rather than walking a beat. Officers need to be fit for their particular role.

More importantly, being a perfect physical specimen doesn't make up for being a dumbass, having poor judgement under pressure, being lazy on the job, being a bully, being a racist, or any of the other major flaws that have occasionally been observed in officers of the law. In fact, if the idea is to turn the British Police Services into an Order of Modern Supermen* then perhaps these issues should be even higher priority than physical fitness?

ANYWAY...

Having a regular fitness test for cops is not a crazy idea, as long as it's used appropriately and with common sense.

However, for Christsakes, people. Overweight/obese ≠ out of shape. The categories "overweight" and "obese" are based on weight/height ratios, not level of fitness.

*used in the generic, inclusive sense, of course.

BBC story funnier than Little Britain

Many times in the past year, my radio alarm has woken me up with BBC stories on "obesity" that have made me want to hit my head against the wall; stories full of stereotypes, incorrect assumptions, and misleading statistics, without balance or critical thought.

This morning was different. Not that different, because the BBC once again had an obesity story that was full of b.s. But this one was so incredibly stupid that I found it hilarious and have been making fun of it all morning. Even the announcer seemed a bit dubious.

You see, my fat friends, Lord McColl (a 78 year old surgeon and Conservative member of the House of Lords) has the answer. It's easy to get thin. It's amazing how so many of us, with all of our education and life experience, have been unable to figure it out. But now, it's as through the heavens have opened and the light of knowledge has shown down upon us.

Obesity 'cure is free - eat less'

Thanks, Lord McColl!! What a smart guy you are.

But Lord McColl's vast wisdom and deep insight don't end there. Oh no! Have you heard? Exercise isn't the answer! You see, we can't exercise. We're too fat!

Lord McColl said politicians refused to admit that the cause of obesity was over-eating: "In order for an obese person to lose weight - bearing in mind that most of them can't exercise because they are so overweight - all he has to do is eat less.

Why didn't anybody tell me this? Why, I was planning to walk a couple of miles and do a step workout later today, but I forgot that with a BMI of 36, that's impossible! Obviously, my massive obesity renders me immobile. Somebody had better tell Shauta and Regan, so that they'll know that they're too fat to exercise as well.

But wait! Lord McColl is right! Exercising is not making us thin. And as fat people, that should be our sacred duty and only goal in life. Being active? It makes us healthy, happy and physically capable while fat. That can't be allowed! If we fat people fail to be uniformly unfit, disease ridden, and miserable then the universe will implode.

Well, I'll just see if I can haul my massive bulk to the bathroom to take a shower now. So...hard...to...move...so...heavy...pant, pant, pant.

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For anyone who's unaware of how obesity is defined: people are classified as obese if they have a BMI of 30+. BMI is based on weight and height. 25% of Brits and 30% of Americans are classified as obese. The vast majority of obese people have BMIs under 40; the average obese Brit or American has a BMI in the mid-thirties. To get an idea of what that looks like, you can check out Kate Harding's Illustrated BMI Categories.
**********
Oh, and to the BBC commentator who implied that fat people are like heroin addicts? NAW! Wrong. That's not why the "just eat less" thing doesn't work. It doesn't work because fat people don't necessarily overeat in the first place - let alone have anything that could be likened to an addiction - and when we try to eat less permanently, our bodies think they're being starved and fight back by absorbing as much nutrition as they can from what we eat, using as little energy as possible, and making us preoccupied with food and eating. For Chrissakes, read up on Ancel Keyes.

Glenn Beck is Basically an 11 Year Old Bully

How can anyone take this man's political views seriously when this is his mentality:


If I hosted a backyard barbecue and one of the men got drunk and went through that routine, I'd look at his wife with pity and never invite them over again. Glenn Beck did this (presumably) sober and on national television. Unbelievable.

Oh, and here's the PSA he's referring to:


The young, blond woman at the end of the ad who's only showing her shoulders and head is Meghan McCain, the daughter of ex-republican presidential candidate John McCain. Meghan first became well known during her father's presidential campaign, through her blog, McCainblogette.com. She's in her mid-twenties, has an art history degree from Columbia, and these days, is writing for the Daily Beast, where she has written a response. She is a republican. However, Beck and other social conservatives apparently dislike her support for gay rights, birth control, and sex education.

Meghan McCain responded:

"Clearly you have a problem with me, and possibly women in general, but the truth is, it’s 2011 and I heard your show on Fox was canceled," McCain wrote. "Isn’t that an indication that the era of the shock jock pundit is over?...There really is no need to make something like my participation in a skin cancer PSA into a sexist rant about my weight and physical appearance, because I’m going to let you in on a little secret, Glenn: you are the only one who looks bad in this scenario, and at the end of the day you have helped me generate publicity for my skin cancer PSA, a cause that I feel quite passionate about."

and

As a person who is known for his hot body, you must find it easy to judge the weight fluctuations of others, especially young women. If any of your daughters are ever faced with some kind of criticism of their physical appearance or weight, they should call me, because women's body image is another issue I feel passionate about, and have become accustomed to dealing with and speaking with young women about on my college tours."

Good response, Meghan!

Fat Kids Libelled

From The Huffington Post: Obesity Linked to Poor School Performance.

More recent information from the The BODY Project shows that obese youth have problems with reading and arithmetic, memory, attention, and decision-making. Imagine how learning, and consequently school performance, will be impaired if you are having trouble in these essential areas of brain functioning. And, by the way, the more overweight youth are the more they experience the medical consequences of obesity, and the greater the difficulties they have -- in all these areas of cognitive functioning.

This is from last year, before the study in question was published. Before I write a horrified rant, let's take a look at the source.

The article quoted above was written by Lloyd I. Sederer, a psychiatrist who is serving as the Medical Director of the New York State Office of Mental Health. The work that he's referring to in the article was published by Antonio Convit, M.D., a Professor of Psychiatry and Medicine at New York University. Judging from his publication record, Dr. Convit runs a research group that specializes in building disease models around the idea that obesity causes chronic inflammation, and that chronic inflammation causes all sorts of cognitive problems. One of his recent papers compared the cognitive functioning of obese teenagers with type II diabetes to the cognitive functioning of obese teenagers without type II diabetes, and found that the non-diabetic teenagers performed better. That's right. The study compared obese teenagers to obese teenagers. There were no non-obese teenagers involved. Just fat kids with diabetes and weight-matched healthy fat kids. The study was published in November of 2010. The two papers that have come out of Covit's research group since that time were on unrelated topics, so it appears that this is based on conjecture around Preliminary evidence for brain complications in obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus, published in the journal Diabetologia.

Dr. Sederer's article, particularly the quote above, does not make sense in light of the research. Additionally, exposing fat kids and their peers, parents and teachers to these ideas (ideas that are completely unsupported!) is socially destructive. In my opinion, this article should never have been written. It misrepresents the research, and what will people take away from it? Even educated and intelligent readers will think, "fat kids are stupid." It supports existing social biases and imbues them with scientific authority. This is so irresponsible that I'm at a loss for words. Cognitive impairment, indeed.

Dr. Sederer wrote another article for the Huffington Post after the paper was published: The Body Project: School Program Measures Obesity Right Along With Grades. If you look very, very carefully in this article, you can find statements that actually reflect the research, for example:

Students with high BMIs are selected for the project because they are most at risk for sugar, cholesterol and BP problems -- and thus for problems with reading and arithmetic, memory, attention, and decision-making, problems that can impair school performance.

This implies that the cognitive problems are actually related to medical conditions that are correlated with higher BMIs - not the high BMI itself. However, for the most part, the article continues to make generalizations about fat kids' cognitive abilities:

...there is another message that has not yet reached the Education Secretary, Arne Duncan, or other educators seeking to improve education in this country: that message is that being overweight or obese interferes with a young person's ability to learn at school....
...information from the The BODY Project shows that obese youth have problems with reading and arithmetic, memory, attention, and decision-making....

I'll try to be understanding and charitable. Apparently, Dr. Sederer is assuming that all these medical conditions are inevitable consequences of having a high BMI and that therefore, the cognitive problems associated with them are also the result of a high BMI.

However, only a small minority of fat kids have these conditions. For example, the best number I could find for the prevalence of type II diabetes among teenagers on the Centers for Disease Control website was 7.2 per 100,000 (0.0072%). And again, there is no data in evidence that compares the average cognitive abilities of fat and thin teenagers.

Here Comes the Rant

Is the good doctor really unaware of the social forces at work in fat kids' lives and of the potential for harm? That just doesn't seem possible; he's a mental health professional for chissakes. At school, fat kids are bullied, looked down upon, routinely underestimated, and generally treated like garbage. At home, they're more likely to come from poor families and high stress environments. They're also more likely to be members of racial and ethnic minorities. The deck is already stacked against them. Writing and publishing articles that are based on inappropriate generalizations but that appear to lend scientific legitimacy to the idea that fat kids are mentally damaged and putting your authority as the Medical Director of the New York State Office of Mental Health behind it - it's nothing short of evil.

We already tell fat kids that they're unattractive, physically incompetent and weak willed. By all means, let's knock down the only source of self esteem that they're left with. After all, how many fat kids have been bullied, excluded, and looked down upon but have been able to fall back on their intelligence and talent? That can't be allowed! We must make it clear that they are completely worthless unless they become thin.

And how will they become thin? Well, there's no dependable method, really. Sometimes kids are fat for a while and then grow out of it. "Eat less, move more" doesn't necessarily work long term, although certainly being physically active and eating a healthy diet is good for kids of all sizes. However, when when you make a big fuss about weight, kids become more likely to stay fat or develop an eating disorder. Weight loss surgery for teenagers is becoming a popular idea, thanks to Allergen. However, I strongly suspect that WLS is far riskier for teenagers than being fat. So, this article is reinforcing - in a potentially harmful way - the idea that fat kids are damaged and inferior, when there is no safe and dependable way to make them thin. It would be cruel and completely pointless even if the assumptions it's based on were true.

Let's take a step back in time, shall we? I've got a story to tell.

My dad and his sisters were fat kids in the New York City schools. They were from a stressful home environment; a poor immigrant family. They grew up in the 1930s to the 1960s. I'm sure that there are still many like them in American cities today.

The children in the picture in Fat Kids Targeted are my dad and his sister. Dad was relentlessly bullied. He concentrated on school, and he had teachers who acted as mentors. He attended Stuyvesant High School, the famous NYC magnet school, and then Columbia University. He finished off with a Ph.D. from UC Berkley. Both of his sisters also attended university. Dad was one of those fat kids who internalized the idea that they can't be physically competent. Good thing they forgot to tell him and his teachers that fat kids are dumb.

My dad and his sisters: these were very vulnerable kids. What would have happened to them if their teachers had focused on their weight? If these teachers had failed to support them academically because they assumed that fat kids couldn't be smart? What if they, as kids, had never been allowed to think of themselves as intelligent or had been told that losing weight, not learning, should be their number one priority? They'd probably be sweeping floors now, their potential lost to society. Instead they've led long and productive professional lives as fat people.

Not only is this possible, it's common. Most fat kids grow up to be productive members of society even if they stay fat. And, they are more likely than not going to be knowledge workers. Impairing their ability to achieve and advance academically by promoting negative stereotypes is incredibly irresponsible. I can see a fat underclass being created before my eyes. I guess that grinding racial and ethnic minorities under our heels hasn't been enough for us.

We're a 'Tsunami' now

So, there's a new study out that you've probably heard about on the news. Depending on the mood you were in, you may have either shaken your head sadly or fallen over laughing.

Agence France-Presse (AFP), a news service, reports on it here: 'Tsunami' of obesity worldwide: study.

So, okay. The real name of the article is "Stemming the global tsunami of cardiovascular disease," and it was published in the medical journal The Lancet earlier this month.

The news release sums it up in a single sentence:

High-income countries have... seen a drop in cardiovascular diseases since 1980, despite high levels of obesity.

So, how does this translate into a 'Tsunami' of either heart disease or obesity? Well, apparently, we're all gonna keel over any minute now, folks. There's no data to support it, but surely it will happen soon, because there are so many bad, bad unhealthy fat people out there. Booga booga.

There's a good post about this wonderfully sound-bitey yet logic-challenged study over at Nicholosophy.

And now, please enjoy this awesome video of Jimbo Pellegrine. He's ready to ride that Tsunami!

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